Free Worldwide Access to FindMyPast – a wide-eyed kid in a strange sweetie shop

Oh yes! As a FMP subscriber I have access this weekend to worldwide records from free! Yeay!

And I’m working tomorrow and out on Sunday afternoon!  Bad timing me!

1920 Census - something in the church?

1920 Census – something in the church?

And amazingly the very first record I find, in the 1920 census, is Eliza, my distant cousin. Because that happens all the time in genealogy, not. So I discover when they arrived and when they naturalised, a new thing to discover abut one of my family members, ah, so that’s what it means…  And I discover Edward and Eliza’s second, American, child, and that Edward works in a church, although I can’t read exactly what it is he does there… Ideas, please?

And I’m so happy.  But there’s a sharp taste to the sweetness. OK, so I’ve got used to the fact that in 1891 the Scottish census form asked the enumerator to identify if a person is a ‘lunatic, Imbecile, or idiot’ and to identify whether they speak English and/or Gaelic. But colour? And in the 20th century?  Asking someone to record another person’s colour is a whole different league.  It’s just breathtaking to see it in, well, black and white. That’s the real fact that’s so hard to comprehend.

Lynne Black, 18 September 2015

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