Tag Archives: Paul

Honor Jacco and Samuel Plomer: their family in the Fradgan

Honor was born in 1816 and was the fourth child of Peter Jacco and his wife Catherine Noell nee Kelynack.  She grew up with two older brothers Peter and Benjamin, and a sister Jane in the fishing village of Newlyn in the parish of Paul; she was baptised in Paul Parish Church on 28 August 1816. Later brothers and sisters William, Charles Kelynack, Matilda and Richard were born between 1819 and 1830.

This was in the Regency of the future King George IV. Unlike him his wife Caroline was very popular in Cornwall and when she won her law case against her husband in 1820 the people of Newlyn lit tar barrels around Mount’s Bay and wore celebratory mottoes such as “Queen Caroline Forever” in their hats.  George was crowned in 1821 – leaving his wife Caroline to hammer angrily but fruitlessly on the doors of Westminster Abbey during his coronation.

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Fradgan, Street An Nowan

The lower area of what is now Newlyn in which Honor grew up was called Street An Nowan and was a settlement of about 300 people[1].  At the time the name Newlyn referred to the area of [modern] Newlyn situated on higher ground above the “small, but commodious pier, capable of containing vessels of one hundred tons burthen; but is chiefly employed by the numerous fishing boats belonging to the place, which exceeds four hundred in number”.  There were 900 people living there in 1820[2].

During her childhood there were storms and hurricanes which tore into Mounts Bay damaging ships[3][4] and tearing up the seafront between Newlyn and Penzance, wet summers and shipwrecks.

In June 1841 she was living in the Fradgan of Street An Nowan, the type of lane area which doesn’t bother with street numbers on the early census records.  She is likely to have been working as a servant at that point as she was seven months later when she married.

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Paul Parish Church

Honor married Samuel Plomer [Plaumer] on 28 January 1842 at Paul Parish Church.  He was a fisherman born in Mullion Cove who was a son of a labourer.

In spring 1844 they became parents with the arrival of their daughter Catherine, who was baptised at the same church on 18 December 1844.  Elizabeth Mary was born in summer 1848 and baptised that November.  In March 1851 the family were living in the Fradgan still and their next daughter Jane was born c November 1853 and baptised on 17 March 1854.

In autumn of the following year her father Peter Jacco died, followed by her mother Catherine towards the end of 1856.

The fourth and final daughter, Agnes, was born in 1857 and baptised on 26 August of that year, again in Paul Church.  In April 1861 the family was living at 9 Fradgan in Street An Nowan.

However their was tragedy for the family w hen their oldest daughter Catherine, who was only 24, died in August 1868, and was buried up at Paul on 2 September.

By April 1871 the family were living in Chapel Street, Street An Nowan, Samuel still fishing.  They were living next to Honor’s older brother Benjamin and his wife Priscilla and their family, including their daughter Catherine, son-in-law James Rowe and grandson Benjamin – all of whom are my ancestors.  It was a small community. Their three daughters Elizabeth Mary, Jane and Agnes were all working as net makers.  Cruelly at the end of that year Honor and Samuel’s second daughter Elizabeth Mary, aged 23, died three years after her sister Catherine, and was buried on 27 December 1871 in Paul.

Their two remaining daughters, however, both married and had families.

Honor and Samuel’s third daughter Jane married a mason’s son from Newlyn called Edward Collins in early 1875.  However the couple moved away to Lancashire where in April 1881 Edward was working as an Assistant Marine Superintendent from their home in Kirkdale. Kirkdale “lies on the river Merrsey, the Leeds and Liverpool canal, the Liverpool and Southport railway, and the Lancashire and Yorkshire railway”[5].

Together they had seven children, of whom four died young.  Jane was born in 1878, Edward in spring 1880, Florence Evelene in late 1890 and Ethel in late 1892.  Ethel was working as a clerk typist in April 1911 and married Frederick Wylie in 1916.

Honor and Samuel’s youngest daughter Agnes married Richard Carne, also from Newlyn, in early 1879.  He was a ropemaker in the Royal Navy, whose records describe him as 5’4” tall, with dark brown hair and dark blue eyes and of sallow complexion.  Richard worked on various ships between 1875 and 1891, several times on the Indus but also the Triumph, the Ganges, the Nankin, the Newcastle, the Valiant and the Bellarophon, with his conduct being consistently described as either Very Good or Exemplary.

Agnes and Richard’s first child, son Samuel Plomer Carne, was born in Newlyn some point in late 1879 or early 1880, but by April 1881 the family were living in Devonport, [Plymouth] Devon, where their daughter Agnes Gertrude had been born ten years after her brother in late 1889/early 1890.  However they must have moved soon after that as on 28 March 1890 Agnes and Richard baptised Agnes Gertrude in Mylor [near Falmouth] in Cornwall where at one time there had been a small RN Dockyard[6].

The following April, 1891, Richard was working on the Ganges in Falmouth Harbour and the family were living in Mylor Bridge.  The 1911 census recorded Agnes and Richard as having had 3 children born alive, 2 still alive and one died.  So I wonder if they’d had a child in the mid-1880s, given the large gap between the birth of Samuel and of Agnes Gertrude.

By March 1901 Richard had retired from the Navy and the family were living in Tolcarne, by Newlyn, with him a Naval Pensioner and son Samuel a carpenter.

In 1902 Richard and Agnes’ son Samuel married Eliza Ethel Jenkin, a Penzance girl. The young couple had a son Ernest in 1903 and a daughter Gerturde Kathleen in 1904 in Penzance but by 1911 they had had and lost two further children.

In 1915 Richard, aged 61, was serving in the Navy again in the First World War, first on the Dreel Castle then the Valid 1 until it was decommissioned in 1916.  After the war he returned to being a Naval Pensioner until he died three years later on 30 August at home in Tolcarne. Agnes lived on until 1935 when she died at the age of 78.  Their son Samuel had served in the First World War in the Labour Corps.

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Sheffield Road Cemetery, Paul

Honor and Samuel lived on in Chapel Street, Newlyn after their daughters had left the area.  In 1891 Samuel was marked as a retired fisherman.  Honor died on 13 March 1893 and was buried on 17 March in Paul’s Sheffield Road Cemetery.  Samuel died two years later and was buried on 19 August 1895.

Photograph of Mullion Cove by Robert.Pittman, Flickr, Creative Commons License, no changes;
Words and all other photos © Lynne Black.
First published 11 February 2017 at https://starryblackness.wordpress.com/2017/02/11/honor-jacco/

[1] The History of Mount’s Bay, comprising Saint Michael’s Mount, Marazion, Penzance, Mousehole and &c &cm 1820, P63, Internet Archive

[2] The History of Mount’s Bay, comprising Saint Michael’s Mount, Marazion, Penzance, Mousehole and &c &cm 1820, P63, Internet Archive

[3] London Courier and Evening Gazette – Tuesday 27 May 1828, p3, via BNA http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001476/18280527/010/0003

[4] Public Ledger and Daily Advertiser – Tuesday 18 November 1828, P3, Col 3, via BNA http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001255/18281118/020/0003

[5] John Marius Wilson, Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (1870-72) quoted in the Genuki Kirkdale site http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Kirkdale

[6] Lake’s Parochial History of the County of Cornwall by J Polsue (Truro, 1867 – 1873), quoted in the Genuki Mylor site. http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/Cornwall/Mylor

Photo of Newlyn Harbour from Newlyn Beach, Cornwall

William Rowe 1793 pt1: Boyhood in a poor Cornish fishing town

photo of Paul Church

Paul Church

William Rowe was born c1793 in Newlyn, Paul Parish, in the West Penwith area of Cornwall.  He was the second son of labourer James Rowe and his wife Patience (nee Rodda).[1]  William was baptised aged 2-3 on 29 Mar 1795 in Paul Parish Church[2].  His was the first generation to be born in Paul Parish; his parents were from St Buryan parish.

I’ve found two brothers and a sister for William: James was baptised on 3 October 1790 and Ann was baptised on 23 September 1792.  However she died in infancy and was buried on 8 June 1793. Younger brother Thomas Rodda Rowe was baptised on 13 January 1802, all in Paul Parish Church.

William’s childhood years were those of the French Revolution, of war with France and the Regency. During those wars a battery was located on the road between Newlyn and Mousehole “forming a great security to the Bay, from enemy’s ships, or privateers, should any of them be induced to visit any part of it.  Adjoining to this battery stands a furnace for the purpose of making shot red hot.  During the war, this battery was governed by a small party of the royal artillery.”[3]

Times were hard in West Penwith and when he was about 7 in 1801 the family would have been hungry as a result of the high price of wheat.  It was reported in the London Courier and Evening Gazette on 20 April 1801 that in St Austell, 40 miles away, the tinners had tried forcing farmers to sell it at an affordable price by threatening to put nooses round farmers’ necks until they signed a document promising to sell it at an affordable rate; but they were taken into custody at St Mawes. In Helston the Volunteer Cavalry found it hard to keep order until most of the local farmers came forward and promised to sell wheat the following Saturday at ‘two guineas, and barley at one guinea the bushel’.

In Penzance two Newlyn men petitioned the Mayor that he reduce the prices in Newlyn; but when he chose not to listen they ‘assembled on their own authority’.  The constables and military were called out and further ‘mischief was prevented’ but the disturbances kept many country people away from selling their goods at the markets.[4]

In 1806 there was a call for designs for a bridge across the small river Coombe in Newlyn which divided the Paul and Madron parishes. The bridge was to ‘to contain in length about seventy feet and in breadth about eighteen feet ’. Designs were due to be considered at the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace in January 1807 with the target for completion 6 October 1807.

In October 1809 there was a huge gale, and the ‘L’Eole, a French prize to the Surveillante and Medusa frigates, laden with salt, &c, arrived in the Mount’s Bay a few days ago, and being driven by the gale from Gwavas Lake, ran for Newlyn Pier, but got upon the rocks, where she now lies’ and it was doubtful she could be rescued as the gale still continued.

Photo of altar of Paul Parish Church

Paul Parish Church

In August 1812 a good crop of potatoes, was reported, which coupled with a good haul of pilchards and hake, ‘greatly relieved the poor in Cornwall from the pressure occasioned by the high price of corn’.[5]

So it would have been on a slightly fuller stomach that William married Alice Daniel, a blacksmith’s daughter from neighbouring Sancreed parish, on Saturday 17 October 1812 in Paul Parish Church up above Newlyn.

Their story continues here: William Rowe, Cordwainer of Newlyn and Alice Daniel of Sancreed

Words and photos © Lynne Black, 31 July 2016

 

[1] A DOB for William of c1788 DOB is indicated by his death certificate and the 1851 & 1861 censuses. However even though they match, I believe that William was the third child and not the first, given his baptism year 1795 and the fact he was stated on the 1841 census as being 50. Age at marriage isn’t indicated in the record.

[2] Paul Baptism registers accessed via Cornwall OPC website and FindMyPast

[3] The History of Mount’s Bay, comprising Saint Michael’s Mount, Marazion, Penzance, Mousehole and &c &cm 1820, pp75-76, Printed and sold by J Thomas, via Internet Archive http://archive.org/stream/historyofmountsb00penz#page/n0/mode/2up

[4] London Courier and Evening Gazette – Monday 20 April 1801, P3, Col 2, via BNA

[5] Caledonian Mercury – Saturday 09 February 1811, p2, col 1, Lloyds’ Marine List, Feb 5th

Aisle of Paul Church, Cornwall

Thomas Henry Rowe, wherever he went, and Phillis Harry Wright

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St Mary’s Church, Penzance

Thomas was the son of a Penzance-based mason called John Rowe and his wife Sarah. Although born for some reason in Devonport, Devon [Plymouth] in early 1848, he spent his infancy in Penzance where he was baptised in Madron, Penzance Chapelry [later St Mary’s Church] at the age of 2.

Thomas’s family moved away before spring 1859 to Lower Solva, Whitchurch, Pembrokeshire in South Wales with his parents, brothers and sisters. Later baby niece Annie joined the household when Thomas was 11. However by the time he was 14 the whole family is likely to have been back in Penzance when his oldest sister Elizabeth, baby Annie’s mother, married the baby’s father there in 1862.

Soon after that Thomas lost three key females in his life. Firstly at around about that time his mother Sarah died.  Secondly on 30 July 1864 his second sister Catharine got married before moving away to Portsea, Hampshire, for a couple of years then on to south Wales. Eldest sister Elizabeth also left Penzance, in 1866, vanishing from his life.  However his father remarried that December.

Thomas married Phillis Harry Wright on 27 April 1968 at the Paul Parish Church (pictured at top).  His bride Phillis was a Mousehole girl, born 8 miles from Land’s End in Cornwall, whose fisherman father and his family lived in Mousehole, Post Office Square. John had his own nets and fished on the Nile fishing boat.

Photo of Mousehole Harbour, Cornwall

Mousehole Harbour, Cornwall

Although their first child, Thomas Henry, was born at the end of 1869 in Mousehole, there are registration records of a birth and infant death of a child also called Thomas Henry Rowe in their area in 1868-1869 so it may be that he was actually their second child.

The family were living in Belgrave Terrace, Penzance, in April 1871, but by 30 September 1873 they had moved to nearby 6 Alma Place, Penzance.  That was the date of the baptism of their next child, daughter Sarah Helena who had been had been born c1872 followed by A Maria c1873. Their final known child, John Wright Rowe was born on 13 December 1876 in Penzance and baptised the following October in Penzance St Mary’s.

That was the last record I can find of their father Thomas’s location.  Although the family were still in Alma Terrace on 3 April 1881 for the census, he was away from home on that date and Phillis is recorded as a mason’s wife, so that would suggest he’s still alive. It looks like that day young Thomas (11) and Sarah (9) went down the hill to visit their grandparents John and Cecilia Rowe as they are recorded at their house too!

Ten years later Phillis was working as a launderess and the family had moved up the hill within Penzance to Caldwells Road.  Living at home with her were 18-year-old Maria who is working as a tailoress and 16-year-old John who was an errand boy.

photo of Paul Church

Paul Church

In 1900 Sarah Helena married in Paul Church, just up the hill from her mother’s childhood home. She had been living in a tiny place called Trungle immediately next to Paul village. Her groom was Harry Burgess, a salesman and later an insurance agent, who’d been born in Sherborne, Dorset.

Strangely on the 2 April 1901, the 7 Leskinnick Terrace [Penzance] census return identifies Sarah H Rowe for the census as living with Phillis, describing Sarah as a single 29-year-old dressmaker.  I think that perhaps the enumerator had incorrectly recorded Sarah by assuming that because she was at home with her mother she was unmarried.

Sarah and Harry had four children together. Phyllis Frances (26 April 1903), a child who was possibly born c 1905 but died before 1911, Marie Doreen in summer 1907 and Dorothy Constance born before 2 February 1910, all in Penzance. The family were living at a different address in Penzance for each of these baptisms. Curiously Phyllis’ baptism was non-conformist whereas everything else in their lives was CoE.

In 1902 her son John Wright Rowe married Emma Payne, who’d grown up on a small island in the Isles of Scilly, her story will follow.  They had their children Doreen in 1903 and George in 1908, both registered in the Penzance area, but seemed to spend some time apart at one point.

In 1911 Phillis was living with Harry and Sarah Burgess and their three daughters in Dominic Street, Penzance, and this was the first time I’d see her described as a widow.

Phillis died in 1937 in the Penzance area. Sarah and her daughter Phyllis Frances were still in Penzance in 1939.

Text and photographs © Lynne Black, 22 February 2016
First published: https://starryblackness.wordpress.com/