Tag Archives: Gateshead

#52Ancestors #42: Thomas Halliday 1st of the 2nd Royal Manx Fencibles

Last week I wrote about Thomas Halliday 3rd, commercial traveller and soap agent. I’d planned to write this week about his father, Thomas Halliday 2nd, but when I had a look at his information I realised it was a virtually identical story.  So let’s skip a generation to Thomas Halliday 1st, my 4GGrandfather.

With Thomas Halliday 1st we’re standing at the edge of easily-accessed facts, with the mists of time lapping round him.

I came across this Thomas when trying to find information about his son’s date of birth.  An additional challenge seems to be that at this point in time the names Halliday and Holliday start to be used interchangeably.  I have two sources for Thomas’ marriage, one spelt each way and I’m confident I’ve found the right man.

Lt Col Charles Small's seal, from FindMyPast

Lt Col Charles Small’s seal, from FindMyPast

Thomas was born in Chester-Le-Street, Durham county, in England in 1778, in the reign of George III and grew up working as a labourer [information obtained via FindMyPast].  This was a time of wars and rebellions, and in 1795 Thomas enlisted in His Majesty’s 2nd Regiment of Royal Manx Fencibles [based on the Isle of Man] and ended up fighting in Ireland.  Royal Manx Fencibles?  Great title but meant nothing to me.  So these two websites

tell me it was a regiment based in Ireland between 1795 and 1802 under the immediate command of Lt Col Charles Small, with the regiment in the the overall command of Colonel Lord Henry Murray [nephew of the Duke of Atholl].  Their uniforms included blue facings and fur-crested round hats. [From Osprey’s Google book Armies of the Irish Rebellion 1798]

Thomas “served well and faithfully in the abovenamed Regiment for two years” before being discharged with “his pay arrears of pay, clothing and all other just demands whatsover, from the time of his enlisting into said Regiment till the day of his discharge”.

Two years?  Surely that’s quite a short time to serve?  Unfortunately yes.  The surgeon’s letter (John Nelson Scott was an officer and surgeon) explained more fully that Thomas had needed to have his right leg amputated after suffering from scrofula (TB) of the leg and ankle which gave him extreme pain.

The mark of Thomas Halliday 1st

The mark of Thomas Halliday 1st

After returning home from Lifford, Thomas married Hannah Smith in 1810.  I think they may have had 3 children together: Thomas 2nd, Sarah Mary, and possibly Francis, all in Chester-le-Street.  From the limited records available I believe his wife died in 1838, and in the 1841 census Thomas was found in the workhouse.  A Thomas Halliday died in Gateshead in 1843.

52 ancestors logoNow his son did pretty well for himself: in 1841 Thomas the 2nd was a clerk in nearby Gateshead and ended up very comfortably off with a well-educated Methodist family.  It’s a pretty big leap for the son of an illiterate one-legged labourer, but perhaps that’s exactly what drove him.  Maybe Thomas 1st was in need of comfort and hope, and Methodism provided that, and the opportunity for him to make a better life for his family.  But even if further evidence comes to light, possibly from a non-conformist source, and he turns out not to be my ancestor, I thought I would share the experiences of this Thomas Halliday 1st anyway, to acknowledge all he went through.

© Text copyright Lynne Black 15 October 2014
First published: https://starryblackness.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/thomas-halliday-1st/

#52Ancestors #41: Thomas Halliday 3rd, seller of soap

Thomas Halliday 3rd

Thomas Halliday 3rd

Thomas Halliday, my Great-Great-Grandfather, was born in November 1835 and baptised on Christmas Eve 1835 in the Methodist New Connexion Chapel in Gateshead. He was the oldest child of Thomas and Jane Halliday and his parents had had another 6 children by the time he was 12: Hannah, Mary (who I believe died young), Mary Jane, David Ingram, Elizabeth and Sarah Jane.

Thomas was still in Gateshead in 1851 when he was 15, and working as a draper.  However, by the time of the 1861 census when he was 25, he was living in Leeds, West Yorkshire where he married Mary Anne Howe.

Together they went on to have six children, Martha E in Shipley, Mary Hannah ‘Susie’ in Gateshead, Thomas and Jane Anne in Leeds, Elizabeth Helena ‘Lena’ in Gateshead and their youngest, my great-grandmother, Sarah Emmaline ‘Sallie’, in Burley. Thomas during those years worked variously as an assistant soap agent & traveller (like/with his father), a clerk in an iron works and as a grocer’s commission agent.  Their daughters worked as weavers and tailoresses, Thomas 4th became a clerk in a telegraph office.

Mary H 'Susie' Halliday

Mary H ‘Susie’ Halliday

In 1891 when he was an executor for his mother Jane Halliday’s will, he was specifically bequeathed her green drawing-room suite, her cabinet and her small needlework sewn frame, with Mary Anne being bequeathed her gold watch key.  Up until that point Thomas and Mary Anne had been in possession of Jane’s piano but Jane bequeathed that to Thomas’ younger sister Sarah Anne.

By 1901 Thomas had retired as a butter salesman.  He and Mary Anne were living in Bayswater Row, Leeds.

Thomas died 3 years later of a stroke in Berwick in Elmet aged 68.  Unusually for a member of the Halliday family, he didn’t leave a will.

52 Ancestors logo© Text and photos copyright Lynne Black 7 October 2014

First published:

https://starryblackness.wordpress.com/2014/10/06/thomas-halliday3/

#52Ancestors #39 the lovelorn Miss Edith Young

52 Ancestors logoEdith Hannah Young, the youngest of seven known children of George Shields Young and Hannah Halliday, was born c 1873 in Gateshead into a comfortably well-off Methodist family.

When she was 5 her father’s business pottery partnership was dissolved and soon after that they moved away to Horton in Yorkshire.  Three summers later George died, aged 46.

Things may have been tough for a while, but ten years later, when she 18, the 1891 census records Edith as a secretary at the Bradford School of Music; with her education and the family’s interest in music I hope she was happy there.

However by 1901 her circumstances had changed drastically. She, her mother Hannah and two of her sisters, Marion and Mary, were all living down in Okehampton, Devon, 300 miles away.  I suspect they moved when Mary got a teaching post, but in that space of ten years Edith had also been married and widowed.  Her late husband, Mr Rowe, is a mystery; I’ve made a variety of searches on both Ancestry and FindMyPast but nothing is obvious without the purchase of birth certificates (with no guarantee of success) which I will only do if I come up on the Lottery. [I won a pound on a £1 scratch-card this week – breaking even is a rare treat so I’m not holding my breath!]

I couldn’t find Edith in the 1911 census with her mother and sister (by then in Pembrokeshire), so I started searching for a possible second marriage for her.  Lo and behold I discovered Edith Hannah Rowe marries an Okehampton man, Francis Worden, in Pembrokeshire in 1905.  Had they been pining away without each other?  Lots of Edwardian sighing going on until he came up to marry her and sweep her back to Okehampton where he worked as an architect & surveyor?

1911 Census names of Francis and Edith Worden

1911 Census names of Francis and Edith Worden

Fitting in with the 100 year rule (with which I quite agree) I can’t find any info on them until 1939. By that year Francis had retired and they were living down in Bude, Cornwall, as located via Kelly’s Directories.  Edith died in April 1942 in Stratton, Cornwall; Francis died later, in 1957.  There are other Wordens in Stratton so perhaps Francis had family there to share his last days.

© Text copyright Lynne Black 29 September 2014
First published: https://starryblackness.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/edith-young/